Tag Archives: Death

Life and Death


Behind my home is a cemetery. Yes, as in a graveyard complete with headstones from the 1800’s, flags at Veteran’s Day, and the occasional graveside service. The cemetery has some of the best paths for running and walking. It’s generally empty, and if there are cars driving through, they drive pretty slow. The other day I was running through the cemetery and a song by Jon Foreman came on. Here are the lyrics:

I’m gonna miss you
I’m gonna miss you when you’re gone
She says, “I love you
I’m gonna miss hearing your songs”

And I said, “Please,
Don’t talk about the end
Don’t talk about how every living thing goes away”
She said, “Friend,
All along I thought I was learning how to take
How to bend not how to break
How to live not how to cry
But really I’ve been learning how to die
I’ve been learning how to die”

Hey everyone
I got nowhere to go
The grave is lazy
He takes our body slow

And I said, “Please,
Don’t talk about the end
Don’t talk about how every living thing goes away”
She said, “Friend,
All along I thought I was learning how to take
How to bend not how to break
How to laugh not how to cry
But really I’ve been learning how to die
I’ve been learning how to die”
Die…Die…
I’ve been learning how to die

[Learning How To Die; Jon Foreman]

Very recently, my friend and I were talking and somehow we ended up talking about death. We all know we are going to die, but everything changes when you begin to put a timetable or expectancy on death. It’s like knowing there is a bomb, but then having someone actually light the fuse. Living completely changes in that moment. Authenticity becomes a must. Goals are reprioritized. The trivial things of yesterday are viewed through a different lens. Hopefully, for the better. Being forced to think about what impact is left behind can frighten or challenge….

Challenge us to consider how our life might last beyond our death.

Just something I’ve been thinking about….


Good Friday- Finale


Excerpts from John 18 & 19

It was the day of preparation, and the Jewish leaders didn’t want the bodies hanging there the next day, which was the Sabbath (and a very special Sabbath, because it was the Passover). So they asked Pilate to hasten their deaths by ordering that their legs be broken. Then their bodies could be taken down. So the soldiers came and broke the legs of the two men crucified with Jesus. But when they came to Jesus, they saw that he was already dead, so they didn’t break his legs. One of the soldiers, however, pierced his side with a spear, and immediately blood and water flowed out. (This report is from an eyewitness giving an accurate account. He speaks the truth so that you also can believe.) These things happened in fulfillment of the Scriptures that say, “Not one of his bones will be broken,” and “They will look on the one they pierced.”

Afterward Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a secret disciple of Jesus (because he feared the Jewish leaders), asked Pilate for permission to take down Jesus’ body. When Pilate gave permission, Joseph came and took the body away. With him came Nicodemus, the man who had come to Jesus at night. He brought about seventy-five pounds of perfumed ointment made from myrrh and aloes. Following Jewish burial custom, they wrapped Jesus’ body with the spices in long sheets of linen cloth. The place of crucifixion was near a garden, where there was a new tomb, never used before. And so, because it was the day of preparation for the Jewish Passover and since the tomb was close at hand, they laid Jesus there.


Day 27 of 46


We are just over half way in the journey to Easter. It feels to me that Easter Sunday is approaching very quickly. I was thinking this morning about how quickly it really will be here and how I want to be ready to experience as full and exciting as a celebration as possible when Easter does finally arrive. Today’s passage is helping me in preparing.

I think to fully experience the joy and the excitement of Easter, I must first sense the gravity of my sin and the greatness of God’s grace. This is what Paul is after in Ephesians 2:1-10. I would encourage you not to just read through the passage, but to linger in it… allow it to focus your heart on who we are, who God is, and who God desires us to be.

Ephesians 2:1-10

And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience— among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind. But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ— by grace you have been saved— and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them. 


Sin and Death


We are entering the fourth week of Lent. Again, it is a journey towards Holy Week when we were remember the death of Jesus and celebrate His resurrection. It is a time for us to prepare for that week; to really reflect and consider our condition so that we can truly celebrate what Christ has done for us. Here is what I read today to help me reflect:

For some Christ-followers, sin and death weave so familiar a narrative that we’ve become numb to their sting. For others of us, the wages of sin and our subsequent spiritual death weigh so heavily that we refuse to accept God’s gracious mercy.
The balance in which God calls us to rest is our certainly dissatisfied with both extremes. As we begin to understand our current spiritual story through the eyes of Christian history, we grieve as we own the sins of humanity yet rejoice with the saints in the climax of our shared salvation story.(Holy Bible: Mosaic)

I don’t ever want to take lightly the story of salvation!

Today’s scripture passage is from Luke 15:1-32. As you read, consider these things… What parable do you identify with? How do you see the interplay between our sin and God’s salvation? What stands out to you? What does it mean for you today as you reflect on sin, death, and God’s salvation?


That One Really Dead Guy


My brother is a pretty cleaver guy. I actually have two brothers who are both quite brilliant, but this is about just one of them right now. There was a day he commented, after reflecting on today’s story, “I wonder what Lazarus thought the next time he got really sick… ‘hmmm, should I pray for healing this time?’ Or did he just figure it was really his time?”

I had never thought about that! Today’s passage from John 11:1-57 focuses on Jesus raising Lazarus from the dead. And yeah, what did Lazarus think the next time he became deathly ill? I mean really, do you ask for healing if Jesus has already raised you from the dead once?….

What do you think? What would it have been like to see Jesus raise Lazarus? What would have been like to be Lazarus? What do you learn from this account?